The Small Things Matter – March 2013 Sacred Heart Girls’ College Newsletter Entry

27 Feb

https://i0.wp.com/bombing.eu/wp-content/uploads/Graffiti-Wall-stock94.jpg

In Malcolm Gladwell’s ‘Tipping Point’, he talks about the concept of ‘Broken Windows’, the brainchild of James Q. Wilson and George Kelling, broadcasting that crime is the inevitable result of disorder. The following has been adapted from this text.

“If a window is broken and left unrepaired, people walking by will conclude that no one cares and no one is in charge. Soon, more windows will be broken, and the sense of anarchy will spread from the building to the street on which it faces, sending a signal that anything goes. In the mid-1980s Kelling was hired by the New York Transit Authority as a consultant, and he urged them to put the Broken Windows theory into practice. They obliged, bringing in a new subway director by the name of David Gunn to oversee a multibillion dollar rebuilding of the subway system. Many subway advocates, at the time, told Gunn not to worry about ‘small’ issues such as graffiti and to focus on the larger questions of crime and subway reliability.

But Gunn insisted that the graffiti was symbolic of the collapse of the system. He stated: “When you looked across at the process of rebuilding of the organisation and morale, you had to win the battle against graffiti. Without winning that battle, all the management reforms and physical changes just weren’t going to happen. Gunn drew up a new management structure and a precise set of goals and timetables aimed at cleaning the system line by line, train by train. Gunn made it a rule that there should be no retreat, that once a car was “reclaimed” it should never be allowed to be vandalised again. “We were religious about it,” Gunn said. The idea was to send a perspicuous message to the vandals themselves.

Gunn’s graffiti clean-up took place from 1984 to 1990. At that point, the Transit Authority hired William Bratton to head the transit police, and the second stage of the reclamation of the subway system began. Bratton was, like Gunn, a disciple of Broken Windows. With felonies on the subway system at an all-time high, Bratton decided to crack down on fare-beating. He believed that, like graffiti, fare-beating could be a signal, a small expression of disorder that invited much more serious crimes. Bratton turned the transit police into an organisation focused on the smallest infractions, on the details of life underground.

The positive effect on both the subway from the approaches of Gunn and Bratton were remarkable. After the election of Rudolph Giuliani as mayor of New York in 1994, Bratton was appointed head of the New York City Police Department, and he applied the same strategies to the city at large. When crime began to fall in the city, as quickly and dramatically as it had in the subways, Bratton and Giuliani pointed to the same cause. Minor, seemingly insignificant quality-of-life crimes, they said, were the tipping points for violent crime.”

While I am not suggesting for one second that our context at Sacred Heart Girls College is comparable to that of the reparation of the New York subway, the same principles do apply. That is, the small, immediate things do matter. So when we ask the girls to wear the correct uniform, or be punctual to class or pick up litter, we are not simply asking them to accord to a set of arbitrary requests. Rather, it is recognition that the undertaking of such requests and responsibilities contribute in a meaningful manner to a broader culture and set of behaviours, attitudes and values which are associated with the mission of the College.

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