Archive | Professional Standard: Te Tiriti o Waitangi RSS feed for this section

Creating a Fearless Culture

19 Jan

hqdefault

“Can interrupt you for a second” or “Please see me in my office in your free.” These are phrases that I have used as a school leader.  Unknowingly I have sent a message of fear to the receiver of the information. While innocently I have created a culture of fear. Ok then how can I avoid doing this:

Be clear with your interactions:

Be careful when I see people. Pick the moment. How we perceive the world helps us determine how we react to it. Self-knowledge can serve as a source of strength allowing us to manage stress through the ups and downs of life and learning. Knowing who we are socio-politically means understanding your core values and how your background and cultural context has shaped them.

Knowledge of self is powerful because it can lead to a genuine respect and appreciation of other people’s values. Additionally, knowing what you stand for can help you identify when and why the behaviors, action or beliefs of others’ clash with your own. We believe “knowing yourself” is the key ingredient to our next competency because once we know ourselves we are empowered to create a place where others can do the same.

Build Trust:

Build trust with others and in yourself. Build deep trust by creating space where people feel safe to share feedback and ask questions Being able to bring your whole self to work is critical; It is also often a luxury because it is risky. Creating a space where individuals can explore their identities inevitably leads to a place where difficult questions and conversations emerge. Brené Brown, known for her research on vulnerability, talks about the components of “Rising Strong” in her book by the same name.

Trusting environments lead to strong teams and strong teams lead to innovation. Imagine what we can do if we intentionally build school cultures that nurture trust: trust to explore, experiment, fail, and learn. Consider the ripple effects this could have on teaching, learning, and problem-solving.

I taker time annually to analyse my educational vision. I need to connect it to my practice. Do you do the same? What do you core values tell you about how you approach tasks? When have my core values lead me to clash with others? What might their core values be? Are they different when dealing with peers and tamariki?

Advertisements

Being innovative v teaching the curriculum.

15 Jan

71oyvy-jgal._sx425_

The viewpoint of “teaching the curriculum” and “innovation in education” is that the curriculum is on one side of the continuum, and innovation is on the opposite side. What separates the great teachers from everyone else, is not what they teach, it is how they teach.

What I am trying to get staff to understand is that how we teach our rich NZ Curriculum is the innovation. This can be seen by the finding of the NCEA review document. Think about how NZQA is now approaching assessment differently.

Recently at an NZQA seminar Principals Nominee were talking about instead of lecturing on a topic, could you have the students create a video or Vlog on the topic, to explain it in an in-depth way?  I don’t think that classrooms should be absent of providing content to students, but I do believe that what we create with the content provides a deeper understanding of what you are learning.  What does it matter if a student does well on a test, but doesn’t understand the ideas a week later?

Instead of downloading Apps students could be creating them. Simply focusing on the word “create,” and thinking about how that would enhance the learning could make a significant impact.

Ok I am not saying that lecture is a bad thing.  I do it all the time and I have seen some great teachers deliver wonderful lessons. I think there are great lessons learned from lecture, but I don’t think that any one way is the best way for all students.  I know that from the experience of being both a teacher and a learner.  But I challenge you to look at one thing in the context of your work, whether it is in leadership or teaching, and ask Is there a better way?

Whakawhanaunga

13 Sep

41452167_1075552865939685_7153783423268552704_n

 

Last week a note I wrote about expectations. As we raise the bar on our expectations that all learners can be successful, we must also raise the bar on rigor for all learners.

When trying to meet the demands of supporting all learners, it is impossible to increase rigor without also attending to whakawhanaunga (relationships). My daughter recently met Helen Clark ONZ. Nobody could fined a better role model as wahine toa.

Personally I have an interest in the tuakanateina relationship, an integral part of traditional Māori society, provides a model for buddy systems. An older or more expert tuakana (brother, sister or cousin) helps and guides a younger or less expert teina (originally a younger sibling or cousin of the same gender). In a learning environment that recognises the value of ako, the tuakana–teina roles may be reversed at any time. For example, the student who yesterday was the expert on te wā and explained the lunar calendar may need to learn from her classmate today about how manaakitanga is practised by the local hapū.Relationships matter greatly. The concept of the tuakanateina relationship, is one that interests me. An older or more expert tuakana (brother, sister or cousin) helps and guides a younger or less expert teina (originally a younger sibling or cousin of the same gender). In a learning environment that recognises the value of ako, the tuakana–teina roles may be reversed at any time. For example, the student who yesterday was the expert on te wā and explained the lunar calendar may need to learn from her classmate today about how manaakitanga is practised by the local people.’

Marzano (2011) notes: “Positive relationships between teachers and students are among the most commonly cited variables associated with effective instruction” (p.82). Simply having positive relationships with tamariki and colleagues will not increase achievement. Quality teacher to student relationships impact student achievement in 4 significant ways:

When teachers build trust and rapport with tamariki, tamariki are more likely to take the necessary risks required to learn at deep levels. As mistake making is an inherent part of the learning journey, tamariki need to feel safe along the way.

When tamariki feel safe, they are more likely to offer teachers the necessary insights and feedback that can support the teacher’s ability to respond appropriately.

When teachers strive to understand each learner’s desires, needs, and assets, they have the necessary ability to connect the learning in targeted and specific way that ensures the learner can be successful.

When teachers know their tamariki well, they can better interpret the meaning behind a student’s unconscious nonverbal responses to the learning at hand. Raised eye-brows, tapped pencils, and deep sighs represent different emotional responses based on the learner exhibiting the behavior.

Unless a teacher knows the tamariki well, it is challenging to make learning relevant or rigorous.

Being Culturally Responsive

3 Aug

images

In Kia Eke Panuku, culturally responsive and relational pedagogy is understood to be contexts for learning where learners are able to connect new learning to their own prior knowledge and cultural experiences. Each learner’s ‘cultural toolkit’ (Bruner 1996), is accepted as valid and legitimate. In this way, cognitive levels and learning activities are responsive to the interests and abilities of individual learners.

Learning activities are interactive, dialogic and spiralling and students have opportunities to engage within their zone of proximal development (Vygotsky, 1976).

Teaching and learning roles are interdependent, fluid and dynamic; students and teachers are able to learn with and from other learners (ako). Feedback and feed forward provides learners with specific information about what has been done well and what needs to be done to improve.

Edtalks.(2012, September 23). A culturally responsive pedagogy of relations. .Retrieved from https://vimeo.com/49992994

Teaching Tolerance.( 2010, Jun 17).Introduction to Culturally Relevant Pedagogy.. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nGTVjJuRaZ8

Tui Motu article: As a teacher….

6 Jul

nzcec18-logo-2

 

 

 

 

I teach in a Catholic school because I love being part of the authentic community that is Catholic schools. We are called to teach with Christ. This passion was formed after eleven years of Catholic education under two religious orders. The Sisters of St Joseph of the Sacred Heart, (“Brown Joes”) and the De la Salle Brothers. In 1994 I began my teacher career in Catholic schools at Francis Douglas College four years after I had been Head Boy.

Our schools are a tight-knit community of teachers, students, whānau , and parish.  Some could say that it is because we all have that one thing that binds us together-faith, but I think it is more towards the fact that we truly care about each other.  Over the years, I have had students who return after graduation talking of how much they loved the sense of belonging while attending our schools and the role we played in their faith journey.

I teach in a Catholic school because we are whānau. We are linked together over students we have watched grow over the years.  We get to know each child on an individual level.  Staff, students, and parents all come together and pray for those who are sick, celebrate a new baby, or even provide a special gift to a family in need.

Being a teacher in a Catholic school encourages me in my faith. All teachers are being watched daily by their students and parents.  Eyes are always watching to see how to react and how we should structure our behaviours.  Parents are personally making sure teachers are meeting their child’s needs.  In our schools, students are also watching my own responses to faith.  My students can smell the difference between real and fake, so this encourages me to constantly keep myself in check and be authentic in my relationship with my students and God. This can be a real challenge. While a DRS and coach of a crack Under 16 rugby team the boys would often look at my reaction to referees call. I constantly reminded myself I was “in the presence of my God!”

Everything is geared towards Christ. In the Catholic school, I am able to complement, discuss, and even explain my beliefs without worry of offending my students.  I can commend a student or thank a student for their help during Mass.  Students can openly discuss their faith and our daily lessons are often linked to our charism.

No matter where you work, obstacles are always encountered.  Working in a Catholic school, you can seek help from a higher authority.  Our staff begins each week in prayer.  We gather together in our staffroom, and thank God for our abilities and blessings, and ask for his help.  Throughout the school year, we support each other in highs and lows.  We celebrate the small victories and pray over difficult times.  We are assured through our faith that no matter what happens, God’s love for us will be there forever. I teach in a Catholic school because I feel I am, we are, all living the Christs mission.

 

The Family

20 Jun

13109085_1710843715862361_2144640558_n

A key note speaker at Catholic Convention and his quote from the Holy Father has got me thinking.

 “families are not a problem, they are first and foremost an opportunity”. The opportunity for the Church is to “care for, protect and support them”. “Once you begin to see the family as a problem, you get bogged down, because you are caught up in yourself.”

The importance of good schooling and parenting is well recognised, but the importance of how schools and families relate is much less understood. The impact of the relationship between schools and families reaches far and wide; affecting wellbeing, behaviour and attainment to name a few. If we are to harness the potential of this relationship, much more must be done to overcome the barriers that exist between teachers and parents today.

Studies have convincingly shown that parental engagement in a child’s learning, rather than simple involvement in school activities, is the most effective way for parents to improve their child’s attainment, behaviour and attendance. Sadly poor parental engagement is having an adverse effect; also taking its toll on pupil, parent and teacher wellbeing.

Many parents say that they have felt patronised, sidelined or ignored by their child’s school, and an equally worrying number of teachers said they had been verbally or physically abused by a pupil’s parent.

Parents and teachers must work as a team to enable parents to connect where it is most important – beyond the school gate, as active agents in the learning of their children in the home. Taking an interest in their child’s education, helping with homework, backing school disciplinary practice in the home and being a source of moral, motivational support are all ways in which parents can effectively engage in education, but such engagement is much easier said than done.

The benefits include:

  • Improved attainment
  • Increased attendance
  • Better behaviour

What are the barriers to effective parental engagement?

Parental experience

The differences between a parent’s level of engagement with their child’s education can be partly attributed to their own experience while at school.

If learning was confined to the school environment, with little engagement from home, they are likely to replicate this pattern with their own children.

In addition to this, some parents may have had a poor school experience themselves, with lower levels of educational attainment. This may mean they lack the skills and confidence needed to positively engage with their child’s schooling.

A chaotic or disordered home environment

When children display behavioural problems in school, disrupting the class and making it difficult for the teacher to teach, there is often an underlying problem in the child’s family life.

If there is nowhere at home for them to study, and no one to help them with that, it will be difficult for children to show that discipline at school.

Parenting support programmes have been shown to be very helpful in engaging the family and boosting achievement, behaviour and attendance.

Family structures

Families in Britain are becoming more diverse, with marriage rates falling and blended families and kinship carers becoming more visible. Schools are challenged to take this into account, ensuring that they are not inadvertently preventing family engagement in education.

Some parents may face barriers to engaging in their child’s education, including disabled parents, fathers, grandparents or other carers, non- resident parents and parents for whom English is a second language.

Family breakdown can have an enormous impact on a child’s well-being. Their attendance, behaviour, and ability to concentrate in class may all be affected by disruption at home. In particularly acrimonious family break-ups, where custody is an issue, schools may be faced with difficulties in engaging both parents. Keeping non-resident parents engaged and active in their child’s life can improve the outcomes for that child.

What are your barriers and how can you solve them?

nzcec18-logo-2

 

Cultural Responsiveness

21 May

cross

This article challenges the reader to consider the under-representation of Maori cultural principles and practices in mainstream classrooms and schools. It explains how teachers can bring more of a Maori worldview to their classroom practices using the culturally responsive seven step Hikairo approach to classroom management:
Step 1: Huakina (Opening Doorways)
Step 2: Ihi (Assertiveness)
Step 3: Kotahitanga (Unity)
Step 4: Awhin
Step 5: I Runga i te Manaaki (Pastoral Care)
Step 6: Raranga (The Weaving Process)
Step 7: Oranga (A Vision of Well-being)
Here is a great piece on the subject. Implementation strategies and student voice from a Rotorua case study are used to explain how respect for Maori concepts and values within an inclusive educational environment can enhance teacher effectiveness.

Whiria te tangata

1 Mar

download

Lots to think about this week as I continue my Te Reo journey on a Wednesday morning with staff. Below is a beautiful karakia, which I am learning this year. Richness of the language always humbles me. It has made me reflect on my Māori learners this week.

Māori students’ educational needs are not homogeneous as Māori identity is diverse (Durie, 1995). It is no secret NZ school students are high performing on a world scale however, the achievement gap between its highest and lowest performers (predominantly Māori) is one of the biggest from all of the countries surveyed (ERO, 2010b). Such research although alarming is not new as ERO (2010a) states: “Although many Māori students have been successful in education, research and national and international testing data continue to show significant disparity in the achievement of Māori and non-Māori students. Improved Māori student achievement has been a key government priority in education over the decade” (p.1). Despite national reports continuing to indicate disparity between Māori and non-Māori students, of the programmes, initiatives, and resources that have been implemented over the last twenty years there have been several successful initiatives such as Te Kotahitanga (Bishop, 2008) and He Kakano (University of Waikato & Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi, 2010).

The question I continually ask is how relevant is my schools curriculum for Māori and students? That is cultural identity – every day, everywhere, from policy, the processes, assemblies, hui, through to practice. It must be more than having a Kapa Haka competition.

Culture cannot be left to all students doing Te Reo for 6 weeks in Year 9. It is about critical pedagogy. Critical pedagogy is not a sense of critical thinking, it is a movement. You need to be in it…culturally sustaining pedagogy. It is NOT about leaving our identity at the gate, which we pick up after school. Rather, collaboration throughout the day, where students can be Māori first, Indian first, Australian first, Pasifika first, and work in ways which are successful. We want our learners to be able to think universally, AND culturally strong.

critical-pedagogy-group-presentation-4-638

This is reflected in Tātaiako – Cultural competencies for Teachers. The Tātaiako – Cultural Competencies for Teachers of Māori Learners supports both Ka Hikitia strategies and aligns with the Graduating Teacher Standards and Registered Teacher Criteria developed by the New Zealand Teachers Council (NZTC, 2010). The main objective of the document is to improve teacher pedagogy and capacity to effectively teach students, particularly Māori learners. For school leaders the focus is on leading and engaging educators in a way that affirms Māori culture while providing the resources to enable this to happen. The document provides five competencies that include a set of indicators and outcomes that differentiate between a graduating teacher and a registered teacher. The five competencies Tataiako (MOE, 2011 p. 4) identifies are:

  • Wānanga: Describes participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Mäori learners’ achievement.
  • Whānaungatanga: Expresses actively engaging in respectful working relationships with Māori learners, parents and whānau, hapu, iwi and the Mäori community.
  • Manaakitanga: Refers to showing integrity, sincerity, and respect towards Mäori beliefs, language, and culture.
  • Tangata Whenuatanga: Explains affirming Mäori learners as Mäori. Providing contexts for learning where the language, identity and culture of Mäori learners and their whānau is affirmed.
  • Ako: portrays taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Mäori learners.

How relevant is your schools curriculum for Māori and students? Whirea te tangata. Weave the people together

He+tìmatanga_+Whakataka+te+hau

 

Mytwosentences

Fitted Storytelling from Edward Roads

Danielle Anne Lynch

Music, Theology, Religion, Education

Learn To Love Food

Food Fun For Feeding Therapy and Picky Eaters

youreffectiveleadership

This WordPress.com site is the cat’s pajamas

NotesFromNina

Meaningful learning and effective teaching with a Finnish twist

where the mountain meets the surf, anything is possible

karen spencer

Let's talk about learning.

Education in the Age of Globalization

where the mountain meets the surf, anything is possible

Teaching & E-Learning

Learning in Today's World

A View from the Middle

where the mountain meets the surf, anything is possible

Powerful Learning: It's a Digital Thing

where the mountain meets the surf, anything is possible

Search Msdn

where the mountain meets the surf, anything is possible

where the mountain meets the surf, anything is possible

Artichoke

where the mountain meets the surf, anything is possible

Mike's Blog

where the mountain meets the surf, anything is possible

Back2skool

Technology lessons from the classroom...

Welcome to the Frontpage

where the mountain meets the surf, anything is possible

Mark's Learning Log

Director of Learning Inquiries Pty Ltd (an experienced educator from Principal to Coach)

Mal Lee

where the mountain meets the surf, anything is possible

where the mountain meets the surf, anything is possible