Tag Archives: Facebook

Facebook and School

12 Mar

Business Communication Duplicate model

Facebook has been a great communication / marketing tool for our school community. According to Facebook “insight” stats – our record is 3700 unique people that viewed content on our Facebook page in one week – usually this averages around 2000 unique people every week.   Most are students –however there are a lot of parents and Year 13 students from last year who still like to feel involved with the school.   We also “like” other community groups.

Status updates are used to promote events / achievements along with uploading photo albums (photos are checked beforehand for any inappropriate pictures, gestures – you need to look carefully as there may be a student doing something silly in the background, and using your discretion if there is a photo that isn’t very flattering
especially with body image conscious teenagers).  A lot of students share our photos on their own profiles and “tag” each other in the photos, as well as being able to post comments on photos and updates.

In terms of a quick way of getting news out – its great – when we had a water shortage and had to close the school we put out a FB update to advise our community.

Students and parents alike asked questions about how to contact bus companies.
Because each person uses their own name – there is very little if any inappropriate posting or bad language.   I have had to remove two derogatory posts in five years of our FB page.

I see the following as being key points:
Making sure its kept up to date regularly and status updates are “as they happen”.    Students really appreciate photos going up quickly –
i.e. most events where I have access to the camera I will post the pictures the same day.   The problem lies with staff members who give you photos weeks later – by then its too late and “old news” and students don’t bother looking at them.    It’s a buzz getting news, videos and photos online before students do!

Keeping an eye on things – I have notifications set to go to my email and I can easily check them on my cellphone.   If there are issues you can react quickly and remove inappropriate posts.

Interaction – if a student posts a really supportive/positive comment– I’ll “like” their comment or occasionally comment as well.   It reinforces positive comments and the way we expect students to behave.  It is a reflection of our dispositions.

A quote I use often dealing with social media is from Eric Qualman (who has written a book on social media and society). “We don’t have a choice on whether we DO social media, the question is HOW WELL we do it.”

How well does your school “do” social media?

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NZ Catholic Education Convention 2015

10 Jun

Useful Links:

Twitter for educators in 60 seconds:

What’s a PLN?

Prezi Presentation:

http://prezi.com/bf-tgefukgzn/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy

Kahoot

Padlet

Cold Turkey

8 Jun

After being inspired by Supersize Me (viewing for the second time on NetFlicks) I decided to go cold turkey and give up social media for a week last Monday.

I was prepared to experience withdrawal symptoms once I switched off my phone/pad/computer, including a strong urge to check my phone/email/social media, a feeling of boredom, and a sense of unease. A sense of being unloved. Yes I know unloved. These feelings should pass.

So Day 1 at 7am I felt immediately what was I missing out on. Something spoke to me A zen moment. I am in control.

By 10am I thought I wish I had planned this better. I needed to text. I saw something and thought hey a tweet around that could be…

By 11:15 it was over. I had convinced myself there was a text that needed answering. There wasn’t but the game was up. Tweeting, Emailing, texting I was back.

There will be a next time though.

Maybe a night for two hours. I should plan some interesting activity in place of screen time. Blogs advocate a digital detox week but this is not for me.

It did make me think. What is my relationship with the screen? What is yours?

My iPhone and My Teaching

22 Feb

While many technological innovations have undoubtedly transformed the position in a relatively short period of time, perhaps there is none greater than the advent of the Smartphone. In my case the iPhone. Some of these are for good and some not so good.

Email:

I am still blown away by the number of school leaders who shut their desktop computer off on a Friday afternoon and come back to over a hundred emails when they return on Monday morning. By accessing emails in this fashion, I can give immediate attention to an issue, concern, or complaint instead of letting it sit. The negatives can be that you never leave work.

Twitter: I love it. Connecting, collaborating and great PD. Those who use it know. Those that ignore it are missing out.

Facebook: The iPhone allows users to fully maintain and update a school’s Facebook page while tracking usage and views through a user friendly “Facebook Pages Manager” app. I regularly use the camera feature to post pictures of various school events and also provide community members with “live” Facebook updates at different sporting events.

Google Drive: This powerful “cloud-based” platform has single-handedly changed the way that we think about word processing and collaboration. I regularly access the Google Drive app on my phone to take notes during classroom observations, to “collaborate” with colleagues throughout the day. Office 365 follows closely behind.

Facebook

10 Sep

This year we have made the jump into the unknown with the exploration of new media in a school setting. We are on Facebook.

Wanting to take a little bit of control over what is said and posted under our school’s name in the Facebook world I have set up an official Facebook page. The experiment is now nine months and 800 likes old. It is time for evaluation. Here are some of my thoughts:.

Communication with the community is important. It is part of the National Education Goals (NAGs) and annual goals this year. By the way they love the photos.

I want to role model to the community, not only students, that Facebook can be positive.

For a long time I have worried about the large number of our students set up a Facebook accounts and been in my office after misusing it. Often these accounts have no privacy setting activated and these kids are far too open with what they post and reveal. I am thinking a few of them will end up ‘liking’ our page, thus offering a great chance for me to have a good solid cyber safety conversation about why the heck they are on Facebook (with them and their parents).

It will be nice to engage parents, staff and ex-pupils in the vibrant life of the school.

So it is all about showcasing – and also pushing social networking accounts into a defined workplace arena which will stimulate considerable reflection on privacy and content. The following link is worth visiting. It is also well worth using as a staff meeting.

http://www.teacherscouncil.co.nz/content/teachers-social-media-website

Social Media

15 Sep

https://i2.wp.com/blog.socialmaximizer.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/social_media.jpg

Just Google “teachers, Facebook, inappropriate” and a flood of articles appear relating the indiscretions and sins of teachers who have overstepped the bounds of propriety by posting inappropriate statements, pictures, and videos on Facebook and other social media accounts. At Staff Meetings this term we have run a number of sessions on this particular subject. I can highly recommend the website below. This has been the main source of many of our resources. http://www.teachersandsocialmedia.co.nz/

Last year, three teachers in the United States were fired for having inappropriate relationships with students on Facebook. In November 2008, five teachers got into hot water for posting inappropriately on Facebook. The phenomenon is not limited to just Facebook. In May of 2009, a teacher in Scotland used Twitter to post inappropriate Tweets. She criticized the school’s management and tweeted about personally identifiable information about individual students in her classes.

When you read these news stories your immediate reaction is to question the sanity and intelligence of people who do these kinds of things, yet, what schools are struggling with is a very unique 21st century problem: the power of social media to connect people in ways that once was not possible, and the ability of individuals to share information in and about their lives on a scale not possible before.

Added to the concern about teachers using social networking inappropriately, is the concern about loss of productivity. A study found that nearly half of office employees access Facebook at work, and those companies lose on average 1.5 percent of total office productivity when employees have access during the workday. According to a study performed by the British employment law firm Peninsula “about $ 264 million is lost per day by British corporations due to office workers dillydallying on Facebook.” This same study also said 233 million hours are lost every month as a result of employees “wasting time” on social networking. By the way just in case you’re thinking I complete my blog at 7am every Thursday here NZ.

With all the negativity though let’s remember these are tool and when used properly they are awesome. Teachers, being lifelong learners need to just be educated to be digital citizens like our students.

 

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