Tag Archives: Healthy Relationships

Catholic Teachers Focus

31 Mar

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One of my soapboxes is that Catholic education is more than having a religion class every day and learning about the Sacraments or ways of our faith. Catholic education is living out the Sacraments and treating one another well.  Catholic education is being able to recognize a student that is struggling with a difficult situation and approaching that student and saying a quick prayer. Catholic education is being able to find those teachable moments and guiding a student to learn to trust the Holy Spirit will guide them to become an even stronger student.

Placing Christ as the centre of my teaching is essential. It’s not just important because I teach at a Catholic school, but it’s also important because my students deserve it. Students deserve an environment where they can grow and learn in the faith. They want this environment. They want opportunities to ask questions about Catholicism.

Our theme at school this year is living our lives with love. As teachers in a catholic school we have to continue to let our light shine. We cannot stop letting it shine because of challenges that we may encounter. We need to have our lights shine brighter during these difficult moments. We each face challenges throughout our lives, but we need to find ways to let our light shine through any crack in that challenge and find a motivation to move forward.

I need to ask myself in our environment ‘Am I there to teach or am I there to lead students to draw closer in their relationship with God?’

I feel I am there to lead students to draw closer in their relationship with God. I enjoy attending Mass and participating in liturgy as a school. I need to be reminded of how my students are forming their conscience and growing in their faith. This reminder makes me realize that I am still learning and growing in my faith.

The growth of my students is an aspect of their learning that I find joy in undergoing. Yes, I am there to teach them history, numeracy, literacy, reading, and rope climbing. But more importantly than the national curriculum or the key competencies, I am around to teach them how to be positive members of our community. I am there to teach them that decisions need to be made with faith and morality as their guide. My faith needs to be a role model. My responsibility is to the community, the parish, the parents, and most importantly the students. If I can’t provide my students with the best religious education experience possible, I need to find ways to do that. I need to lead them to a stronger relationship with Christ.

Catholic education is my vocation. I feel that I have been called to be a teacher in a Catholic school. I feel that I need to be in a classroom to share my faith and to learn with my students. I want to be in the classroom and grow in faith. Teachers need to share the why they are teaching with students and I do share with them my reasons.

Catholic educators need to provide opportunities for students to grow their faith. Walk along the path with them as they journey through new ways to grow their faith. Being a Catholic school teacher is a privilege. Teachers need to treat it as such. Where else can we participate in the education of children and help them become positive leaders in our faith all while growing in our own faith at the same time?

 

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Being a Busy Leader

21 Nov

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Manaaki Tāngata.

We are there to support and care for the people

Don’t you love watching people? It is always fascinating at conferences or meetings. At every break there is invariably the rush to the door, device to the ear or email being checked just checking in.

What do truly great leaders occupy themselves with? What takes their time, what do they prioritize, what should be important and why?

I heard a good phrase this week, “I’m not busy, I’m distracted”.

Leaders don’t have to the busiest people at school the most stressed, do the most hours, do the mahi for others, be the hero against whose everyone else’s measures their worth. Instead they should be good role models for a healthy work-life balance. I need to do this better personally.

Leaders should never be too busy that they become inaccessible: the person that no one wants to disturb because their issues would seem insignificant by contrast.

I like to set goals for the things I would like to achieve in a day. I must constantly remind myself that sometimes the distraction may be far important than the goal, particularly if it is to do with the people you serve. The moment you set yourself goals that can only be achieved behind your desk you are moving from leading to managing.

The staff member who comes into your office wanting the vent, or who is just in need of a sympathetic ear. It is in fostering these relationships, the giving of your time, that a leader is doing their most important work. It is then that they are building trust, and ultimately trust is far more important to an organisation because it unlocks the huge potential of the ‘we’.

There is nothing wrong with being busy, but what you are saying when you go on about it you don’t have time for others, you don’t have the time to cultivate what is the most important task of a leader. As a leader one of your key jobs is building the capacity of others and empowering them to do their roles so you can achieve the organisation’s vision together. We must remember the people. The students. The staff. The community.

Remember, you should never be too busy for the people you serve.

Vision and Relationships

21 Oct

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Ki te kahore he whakakitenga ka ngaro te iwi

Without foresight or vision the people will be lost

This week it was important to “join the dots” and bring staff back to the vision. While these are exciting time it is important not to lose the vision.

As we embark on our collaborative experiment with curriculum our focus in our team this week was lesson one and two as we get to know our students. Here are some observations.

Get to know students from day one. Educators must understand how students prefer to learn. Interest surveys work very well in providing this information. Educators need to find multiple ways to measure knowledge because education is not one size fits all. We will only learn how to reach our students by getting to know them on a personal level.

Set high expectations for all students. I let my students know that they can do ANYTHING if they set their minds to it. At the same time, I let them know that their education is an “us” priority as opposed to a “them”, meaning we have to take ownership for our students or lack thereof. We must bring their parents in early and ensure that we communicate with them along the way.

Celebrate success. Teachers must begin to embrace the idea that any growth is growth that should be celebrated. We need to unplug from the idea that students are numbers when clearly every child is unique and different. A gift from God. We must celebrate those differences and adapt our pedagogy to respond to their diversity. Growth is growth, and it is our job to celebrate our students’ accomplishments.

Listen. We have to take students’ feelings into consideration when we make decisions that impact them. By listening to them, we show them that we respect and value their opinion. Even when we plan lessons, we should give them a voice and a choice as to what their learning should look like. When we respect our students, our students will respect us, and they will open their minds for us.

Relationships matter because good teacher-student relationships breed success. By getting to know students, setting high expectations. Vision matters because without going back to the why we can get a little lost.

Duty Calls

8 Dec

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I love doing lunch duty. I love doing gate duty. I love doing crossing duty. Don’t get me wrong, please don’t give me more, but I do love it. It’s just I think it is such a great time to engage and interact with students outside of the classroom environment. It’s a great way to demonstrate to all students that you’re a team player and a great role model. It’s a really good opportunity to catch up with students and ask them things like how school is going. One of the things I like the most is that it often shows the school off at its best. The hustle. The bustle. It’s the breathing life, heart and soul of the school.

As a teacher we are in the business of building relationships. Chatting with them and catching up with them in a way that you couldn’t do during class time. One of my enduring images of duty was when I saw some Year 13 students helping out some ‘new-to-the-school’ Year 7s learning the ropes in the main hall. It was special.

If you don’t love duty like I do; here are some tips I found that I do to make the time a bit more endearing.

  • Be happy. Even if you’re feeling like rubbish yourself, chances are that many of the students you speak with are having a tough time too. It’s difficult being a teenager or younger pupil. You might just make someone’s day.
  • Pick up a bin and take it to the students. Ask them if they’ve got any rubbish.
  • Be visible. Go to the students. If they’re not where your spot is, chances are they may well be nearby doing something that you should probably be keeping an eye on. Move to them.
  • Have fun. Tell a joke. Ask people what their day has been like. Ask pupils how their weekend was. I tell you the best part of my week is Friday on the crossing seeing all those happy face. What do you do when you’re on duty?

Being a Principal: Some Reflections

18 May

https://i2.wp.com/www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/files/2013/04/principal.jpg

During the last few weeks I have been Acting Principal. As this time comes to an end I thought I should reflect on some key thing I have learned and been aware of. Before you write them off as not applicable to you, consider that these are common in any type of leadership position and in a great deal of literature.

Healthy relationships: A common mistake that leaders make is to hole up in their office and neglect the relationships that will help them to be successful. You have plenty of other things to do, but this is the most important. Make time in your schedule to make the connections that will be mutually beneficial.

Listening: You must go beyond hearing to developing the kind of listening that goes deeper. This kind of listening includes watching body language and observing emotions. If you don’t listen in this way you’ll miss plenty of opportunities to learn and connect to others.

Silence: Leaders who exhibit strategic silence know when to stay still. They understand the impact of words that can hurt, anger, or create fear. They know that when they say too much, others stop speaking and creativity and inclusion are a lost cause.

Appropriate pace: It’s a difficult thing to match the pace of others. I find some leaders are so driven that they outpace those who follow, leaving them in the dust, confused and dazed. Other leaders may be too slow to make decisions and take action, and we all know what happens if this becomes a repeated pattern. You must be authentic to who you are.

Patience: Many leaders are intolerant of others who might do things differently or at a pace the leader finds unacceptable. Action oriented leaders may have a tendency to jump to conclusions before things are thought through. The lack of patience can manifest itself as anger or decisions that aren’t fully thought through.

Calm: Remaining calm is a great asset that can be lacking in many leaders in our high pressure, high stress organizations. Leaders who are not calm may show anxiety and an inability to remain still. They might be excitable at the moments when an organization needs calm, spreading anxiety.

Inclusive: There are very few places where a lone wolf leader can be effective. Decisions are complex, and it takes a village of smart people to help make them. Leaders who aren’t inclusive may find that their organizations lack creativity. The people who are most talented may be taking their brilliance elsewhere.

Respect: A deep respect for all people in the organization is the hallmark of a great and enduring leader. Everyone is treated as someone who matters.

Professional: A leader who is professional is one who dresses appropriately, walks the talk, and is loyal to their organization. Despite how they might feel about certain guidelines, rules, or bureaucracies, they do what needs to be done.

Reflective: Leaders who spend their days reacting are heading for trouble. Most leaders get more responsibility by taking decisive action, but unless they take some time to reflect on past and future successes and failures they’ll eventually run into trouble. Setting aside thinking time is imperative for success. I suppose this blog reflects this.

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